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Breaking Out of a Distinct Social Space: Reflections on Supporting Community Participation for People with Severe and Profound Intellectual Disability

Clement, T., Bigby, C.,

Academic Literature

2009

The goal of ‘inclusion’ has been central to policies that have shaped services for people with intellectual disabilities over the past 30 years. However, it is an ill defined concept with disagreement about its meaning, the problems it seeks to overcome and how it should be realized.

Ethnographic and action research methods were used to collect data on the meaning of inclusion attached by staff when implementing a programme, known as the Community Inclusion Framework, in a group home for five adults with severe intellectual disabilities in Victoria, Australia.

he findings show that most staff attached a different meaning to inclusion from that proposed in the Community Inclusion Framework, disagreed with the proposed meaning or felt these residents were too different for it to be meaningful. This suggests that priority will only be accorded to activities that lead to inclusion if staff are convinced of the veracity of this and given strong and consistent direction and support.

Publication information

Journal/Publication : Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

Location : International

Domain/s: Community and civic participation, Social relationships

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