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Impact of the role of senior dual disability coordinator on the perceived self-efficacy and job satisfaction of mental health clinicians

A. J. Hendren, M. B. Kendall,

Academic Literature

2015

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate a new service role in mental health services, namely, the senior dual disability coordinator role (SDDC) for its impact on the perceived self-efficacy of mental health clinicians in managing clients with dual disability (mental illness and acquired brain injury and/or intellectual disability) and their job satisfaction.;METHOD: Mental health clinicians from a health service district in Queensland, Australia who contacted the SDDC for clinical consultation and liaison between July 2011 and July 2013 were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing perceived self-efficacy in working with clients with dual disability as well as their job satisfaction, prior to (T1) and following (T2) their contact with the SDDC.;RESULTS: Twenty-five clinicians completed and returned pre- and post-measure questionnaires. Self-reported knowledge of dual disability, clinical skills in dual disability, service knowledge in dual disability as well as perceived self-efficacy, and job satisfaction increased significantly from T1 to T2. There were no significant differences across professional discipline or years of service.;CONCLUSIONS: The delivery of a clinical consultation liaison service as part of the role of SDDC may assist mental health clinicians with self-efficacy and job satisfaction, regardless of the number of years they have worked in the service or their professional discipline. Mental health clinicians with improved self-efficacy for working with clients with dual disability may be more likely to consider the client suitable for services through mental health and follow-up with treatment and linking the client with other identified suitable services. Implications for Rehabilitation Dual disability (mental illness and acquired brain injury and/or intellectual disability) presents specific challenges for mental health services Specific strategies are needed to build capacity among mental health practitioners in order to meet the needs of people with dual disability and provide appropriate services. Introducing dual disability coordinators as a specific position within a health service district may assist to improve self-efficacy and job satisfaction of mental health practitioners assisting people with dual disability.

Publication information

Journal/Publication : Disability & Rehabilitation

Domain/s: Economic participation

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