You are here: HomeEducationAre there sign posts at the entry gate? How utilising graduate qualities, threshold learning outcomes for law and inherent course requirements might impact on satisfactory completion of a law course

Current CADR projects

Download a summary of our current projects;

We want to hear from you!

Help us improve the CADR clearing house

Are there sign posts at the entry gate? How utilising graduate qualities, threshold learning outcomes for law and inherent course requirements might impact on satisfactory completion of a law course

Tania Leiman,

Academic Literature

2013

Academics interact regularly with students with documented disabilities under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) who present with Disability Access Plans (DAPs) which state that adjustments to teaching and assessment methods may be required. Academics also encounter students who do not provide DAPs, but nevertheless experience significant difficulties in undertaking skills components of their studies due to issues such as stress, anxiety, procrastination, concerns about participating in public speaking, concerns about participating in small group work and difficulty meeting deadlines in a timely manner. In this paper, the authors consider, first, the legal framework surrounding discrimination within the area of education, and then discuss the higher education regulatory framework including graduate attributes and threshold learning outcomes. In 2013 a Statement of Inherent or Core Course Requirements for the Bachelor of Laws and Legal Practice Degree was developed by Flinders Law School as a pilot for an institution-wide project. The authors go on to explore the impact that this Statement may have in preparing students for the challenges they can expect in their law studies, and particularly in undertaking practical skills components of those studies, whether encountered within substantive subjects or during work placements or during participation in a legal clinic as an enrolled student or a volunteer. Legal skills are now taught in many law schools and in every practical legal training course. This Statement and the authors' experiences in developing it may therefore be of wider assistance in providing guidance for other law schools and practical legal training providers as they begin to develop their own models. It may also be of assistance to other disciplines where courses involve competency in explicit skills components. [Author abstract]

Publication information

Journal/Publication : Journal of the Australasian Law Teachers Association

Domain/s: Education

green strip

Research to Action Guides

  • A Guide for disability practitioners, schools, employers and young people looking to make the transition from school to employment in Australia....
  • The Culturally Proficient Service Delivery Research to Action Guide has been developed to assist in the provision of accessible, appropriate and effective disab...