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Exploring the feasibility of the visual language in autism program for children in an early intervention group setting: views of parents, educators, and health professionals

C. Donato, H. C. Shane, B. Hemsley,

Academic Literature

2014

OBJECTIVE: To explore the views of key stakeholders on using visual supports for children with developmental disabilities in early intervention group settings. Specifically, this study aimed to determine stakeholders' views on the barriers to and facilitators for the use of visual supports in these settings to inform the feasibility of implementing an immersive Visual Language in Autism program.;METHODS: This study involved three focus groups of parents, educators, and health professionals at one Australian early intervention group setting.;RESULTS: Lack of time, limited services, negative attitudes in society, and inconsistent use were cited as common barriers to using visual supports. Facilitators included having access to information and evidence on visual supports, increased awareness of visual supports, and the use of mobile technologies.;CONCLUSION: The Visual Language in Autism program is feasible in early intervention group settings, if barriers to and facilitators for its use are addressed to enable an immersive visual language experience.

Publication information

Journal/Publication : Developmental neurorehabilitation

Domain/s: Education

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