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Investigating the importance of various individual, interpersonal, organisational and demographic variables when predicting job burnout in disability support workers

Vassos, M. V., Nankervis, K. L.,

Academic Literature

2012

The aim of this research was to investigate which factors contribute the most to the prediction of the three facets of burnout – feeling exhausted and overextended by one's work (emotional exhaustion), detached and callous responses towards work (depersonalisation) and a lack of achievement and productivity within one's role (personal accomplishment). A sample of 108 disability support workers (DSWs) completed a questionnaire booklet that contained standardised measures of burnout and job stressors related to disability work. Results highlighted the importance of predictors such as challenging behaviour (interpersonal), workload (individual), supervisor support (individual), work-home conflict (individual), job feedback (individual), role ambiguity (organisational), low job status (organisational), role conflict (organisational), gender (demographic) and work hours (demographic) when predicting one or more of the facets of burnout.

Publication information

Journal/Publication : Research in Developmental Disabilities

Location : Australasia

Domain/s: Economic participation, Health and wellbeing, Sector development and sustainability

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